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Grand Texas Theme Park (aka. AstroWorld 2.0)


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Officials with the hotly-anticipated Grand Texas Theme Parkunveiled fresh details of their upcoming 630-acre entertainment district, capturing the imaginations of those longing for a worthy successor to the long-shuttered Six Flags AstroWorld.

Located along Highway 59 just north of the New Caney exit, the amusement park is expected to open by summer 2015 with seven theme areas devoted to Lone Star history and culture. The Montgomery County Police Reporter blog notes that the project will feature several roller coasters, including one slated to be one of the 10 largest wooden roller coasters in the nation.

Grand Texas' Monty Galland assured the East Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce that the theme park is only a single component of a larger plan that involves 450,000 square feet for retail and dining, multiple hotels, an RV area and a 6,000-seat stadium designed for minor league baseball games.

"Big Rivers Water Park is a 40-acre site where we will integrate the natural surroundings that is already there. Instead of big swaths of concrete, you will see water slides that wind around the towering oak trees and the lazy river will meander through the forest setting that is already there," Galland explained during the meeting. Along with two hotels, the water park will open several months before the theme park.Also on the drawing boards is an elaborate water park that will tap into the region's natural landscape, surely a nod to EarthQuest, the ecologically-minded amusement park planned for a plot of land a mile south of Grand Texas.

The Police Reporter says additional nature-themed amusements — a wakeboard lake, equestrian trails and zip lines — are planned throughout the entertainment district as well as an outdoor amphitheater for concerts and hockey games.

To see Grand Texas to fruition, theme park owners have assembled a team of industry heavy-hitters that includes former AstroWorld general manager Chuck Hendrix and one-time Six Flags Magic Mountain director Bob Logan. Bob Runyon, who designed Woodlands Market Street, serves as chief architect of the project while designer Bruce Robinson (formerly of Angry Birds Theme Park and Dollywood) will oversee all theme concepts.

By 2020, officials anticipate 4.5 million annual visitors to the theme park district, which will bring roughly 2,000 new jobs to the area. As many as 1,600 construction workers are expected to be used during the building process, which begins in January.

Grand Texas marketing director Ashley Higson was unavailable for comment on Thursday, but promised CultureMap that more details will be released in the next week. Stay tuned.

If all goes well, Houston will recieve the spiritual successor to Six Flags AstroWorld in a few years. Personally, I'm glad that Houstonians will finally get their newest theme park since 2005. Hopefully it won't suffer a similar fate as Hard Rock Park/Freestyle Music Park

Edited by MarioSonic94
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It's always good to see new parks actually be completed and open, and this one looks to be well planned out so hopefully it should be successful. I'm wondering about the "several roller coasters" that the article refers to, in addition to what the wooden coaster is going to be since it's supposed to be one of the 10 largest in the country- RMC, Gravity Group, maybe finally another Intamin woodie like El Toro? It will be interesting to see what it is.

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It's always good to see new parks actually be completed and open, and this one looks to be well planned out so hopefully it should be successful. I'm wondering about the "several roller coasters" that the article refers to, in addition to what the wooden coaster is going to be since it's supposed to be one of the 10 largest in the country- RMC, Gravity Group, maybe finally another Intamin woodie like El Toro? It will be interesting to see what it is.

It would be cool to see another coaster like El Toro, although it is one of a kind, so I'm not sure I would want another coaster like that.

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It's interesting that they didn't learn from Astroworld's big mistake. One of the biggest problems with the original Astroworld was that it had too many little themed areas rather than a few larger areas, trying to do too much in too small a space (it was the smallest of the Six Flags parks, smaller than Disneyland).

 

Like so many proposed parks, I'll believe it when I see it. The capital required for building a theme park is just too much for an unproven entity (look at Hard Rock Park).

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I'm with you, GACoaster... I'll believe it when I see it. If you think about it, I don't believe there has been a really successful opening of a new park in the United States since Fiesta Texas in 1992. And, quite frankly, I'd even question it's success given its sale to Six Flags four years later.

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