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Six Flags Great Adventure to Fill 4,000 Positions in 2018

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Six Flags Great Adventure to Fill 4,000 Positions in 2018

 

Fun, Fast-Paced Environment Offers

Valuable, Career-Building Opportunities

 

           

JACKSON, N.J. ─ January 22, 2018 ─ Six Flags Great Adventure and Hurricane Harbor kick off the 2018 hiring season in early February as they launch their search for 4,000 team members to fill positions from March through December.

 

“Through four seasons, Six Flags offers incredible opportunities for practical, resume-building experience,” said Christine Parker, Six Flags Great Adventure’s director of human resources and administration. “We provide a place for many young workers to gain their first valuable work experience, as well as a stepping stone for others to grow and reach that next level in their careers.”  

 

Recently named one of the Nation’s Best and Brightest Companies to Work For® by The National Association for Business Resources for the second year in a row, Six Flags offers a wide variety of positions and paid internships, and provides team members many benefits including advancement opportunities, reward and recognition programs, educational scholarships, free park admission, incentives from area businesses and much more.

 

Parker said that the theme and water parks are looking for friendly candidates of all ages and backgrounds, and is focused on setting applicants on their individual paths for success. “Those looking for a future in law enforcement can begin here in security or loss prevention; students exploring business have a wide variety of choices from marketing to finance and retail. We even offer very specialized positions for those studying animal behavior or zoology, culinary arts, theater and more. The opportunities are endless,” she said.

 

Adults and senior citizens also play a key role at Six Flags. “We provide great opportunities for those switching gears. We have the flexibility to find the right opportunity for adults picking up a second job, teachers on summer break, and retirees looking to supplement their income,” she said. “Because there is extensive room for growth, many find their second home here in a supervisory role or full-time job.”

 

The park will host a series of job fairs, auditions and rehiring events, as well as onsite recruiting throughout the tri-state area at approximately 75 high schools, colleges and special events. Before attending any spring hiring event, new applicants must visit www.sixflagsjobs.com to complete an online application, and rehires must complete their online rehire packet.

 

Six Flags Spring Hiring Events:

 

  • Rehire Celebration – Feb. 1 from 12 to 6 p.m.
    • All rehires are welcome for snacks and fun while hiring back in for the 2018 season.
    • Six Flags Employment Center.

 

 

  • Job Fairs – Feb. 10, March 11 and May 12 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.;
    • All new applicants are welcome. Six Flags Employment Center.

 

  • Employment Center – Beginning Feb. 1, Weds to Fri from 12 to 6 p.m., Saturday-Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    • All rehires and new applicants are welcome.

 

Where to Apply:

 

 

  • Showcase Theatre Auditions
    • 1 Six Flags Blvd., Jackson, NJ 08527
    • Enter via Employment Entrance approximately one mile west of main park entrance, park in employee lot, proceed to Security Gate 5 and follow signs to theater.

 

Available Positions:

 

Ride operations, retail, games, park services, culinary services, admissions, guest relations/VIP services, market research, loss prevention, security, landscaping, safari guides, lifeguards, entertainment performers and show technical support, accounting, cash control, corporate alliance brand ambassadors, public relations and human resources. 

 

More information is available at www.sixflags.com/greatadventure

 

 

 

Source:  Six Flags Great Adventure

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They say 4,000 every year. That seems like a high number though, makes me think they have a high turnover rate

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50 minutes ago, SFGadv123 said:

They say 4,000 every year. That seems like a high number though, makes me think they have a high turnover rate

 

They certainly have a lot of turnover.  Based on my daughter's experience working there, I'd say a good percentage of youngsters don't even make it a full season.

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High turnovers are often a result of poor management.

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20 hours ago, The Master said:

High turnovers are often a result of poor management.

 

Or, you know, employing high school and college aged kids.  

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5 hours ago, Lemur said:

 

Or, you know, employing high school and college aged kids.  

 

It's not just a case of kids graduating and moving on/away or only working in the summer then going back to school.

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On 1/28/2018 at 4:19 PM, The Master said:

High turnovers are often a result of poor management.

 

My daughter can personally vouch for that.  I've told her over and over again that bad managers are more common than good ones in any line of business. All too often people who are good technically, or those that have college degrees in business, are promoted to managers, but do not have the people skills or the proper training to effectively manage subordinates.

 

My wife worked for a small cleaning business for about two years.  The woman who owned and managed the business was totally incompetent as a boss.  I was flabbergasted that her business made any money and was still viable.  And talk about the turnover rate.......and these were not teenagers or college kids she hired.  Eventually my wife got so frustrated with her boss that she had to quit, even though she liked the actual work she was doing.

 

I'm not bashing SFGA.....it's just the way business is in this country.

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2 hours ago, dougdrummer said:

 

My daughter can personally vouch for that.  I've told her over and over again that bad managers are more common than good ones in any line of business. All too often people who are good technically, or those that have college degrees in business, are promoted to managers, but do not have the people skills or the proper training to effectively manage subordinates.

 

My wife worked for a small cleaning business for about two years.  The woman who owned and managed the business was totally incompetent as a boss.  I was flabbergasted that her business made any money and was still viable.  And talk about the turnover rate.......and these were not teenagers or college kids she hired.  Eventually my wife got so frustrated with her boss that she had to quit, even though she liked the actual work she was doing.

 

I'm not bashing SFGA.....it's just the way business is in this country.

I concur:people who become managers aren't always(or almost never) the best one for the job;usually they're the ones who have simply been there the longest or are willing to suck up to the owners/senior managers(it's also known as "workplace politics").

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I'm well aware that manager competency is an issue in all lines and levels of business.

 

I'm also very aware that high school and college kids, with limited exceptions, far more interested in hanging out with their friends or having fun than working and thus have a tendency to "no call no show" or take a job and quit halfway through the summer when their vacation request gets turned down or a more interesting offer comes along.  I spent a summer working at a beach - an incredibly boring, low stakes job that could be done while drunk and/or hung over with little to no consequences - and by the end of August, our original crew of about 100 was down to 20 original kids.  The attrition rate with that age group is extremely high due to low pay, more enticing offers (a bar back gets paid way more), more interesting offers (wait tables/cut grass with your friends), a lack of desire to do the job (mommy and daddy will subsidize lifestyle).  I tend not to hold that against management, as it's pretty much a universal truth when dealing with kids that age.  Now, high attrition rates among adult workers is something else entirely.

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21 hours ago, Matt Kaiser said:

 

It's not just a case of kids graduating and moving on/away or only working in the summer then going back to school.

 

But I thought Neal Thurman was a god among mere mortals? ;)

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4 hours ago, Lemur said:

, a lack of desire to do the job (mommy and daddy will subsidize lifestyle). 

 

 

Don't get me started on this.  I know many kids who have already graduated college, some even with masters degree, who haven't gotten jobs and are still sucking off their parent's teets.  They can't even pay their student loans, let alone pay for bare minimum living essentials.  And there is no urgency to get a good paying job because their parent's enable this behavior.  I told my kids as soon as you are done with school you can still live at home, but everything else is on you.  The Bank of Mommy and Daddy is closed!

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