Sports Illustrated All Star Sports Festival At Six Flags Great Adventure


When Six Flags was acquired by Time Warner every effort was made to tap into the synergies of both companies.  In the early '90s, one of Time Warner's premiere magazine publications, Sports Illustrated, was used to promote an in-park sporting exhibition event.

1992 Season



In early April of 1992, the Garden of Eatin area was stripped of its signage and theme elements in preparation for the first of it's kind Sports Illustrated All Star Sports Festival.







Time Warner always looked for ways to cross promote their stable of brands and properties while they owned and ran the Six Flags parks.    One of the first tie-ins involved Sports Illustrated magazine and the Sports Illustrated All Star Sports Festival.

The All Star Sports Festival debuted in spring of 1992, and took over the Garden of Eatin' area, with exhibits and events throughout the grounds of the picnic facilities.   Each section was decked out with banners and featured different attractions.    







The two main structures, the Festhaus and Picnic Pavilion housed some of the most elaborate displays and attractions.   The primary attractions of the Festhaus were football themed, and featured a set of targets for testing passing accuracy.

The Picnic Pavilion hosted events like roller-blading (which was one of the hottest sports at the time)with large padded wall around a makeshift rink.
  
 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
     
     
     
     
1992 Sports Illustrated All Star Sports Festival
April 17 - April 26 daily
Garden of Eatin'


"Daily April 17 through April 26 enjoy a festival of America's favorite sports featuring games of challenge, sports memorabilia, equipment and much, much more."



Just about every sport was represented in some form or another throughout the festival area, with golf, baseball, football, soccer and basketball competitions and demonstrations.

The festival was part demonstration and part sales pitch for local and national sports and sporting goods vendors.  
   
     
     
1993 Season
   
     
     


     
     
For the 1993 season, the Sports Illustrated Festival came back, this time during peak season rather than the spring, and moved to a new location.   Instead of taking over the Garden of Eatin', the festival took over a large section of the parking lot (which today is occupied by Superman Ultimate Flight).  

Entering the festival area required guests to walk around the old Administration Building down temporary paths which were lined with posters of Sports Illustrated covers over the years.
   
     
     

1993 Sports Illustrated Sports Festival

Sept 10-12, Weekends Sept 18-Oct 10, Oct 11 (Columbus Day)
Main Parking Lot with access through the Goodtime Alley games square

"Experience the world's largest traveling national sports festival as Sega Sports presents The Sports Illustrated Sports Festival September 10th-12th, weekends September 18-October 10th and Columbus Day (Oct 11). 
  The festival allows sports enthusiasts to measure their skills against the performance of "pros in a variety of sporting events, including football, basketball, soccer and golf with pros on hand periodically to give instruction."

"The Sports Illustrated Sports Festival, the world's largest traveling, participatory sports exhibit will allow park Guests to play professional athlete for a day.  Sports Gest offers a variety of events, including football, basketball, baseball, soccer, hockey and golf."

Baseball:  Fast Pitch Games, Batting Games, Double Play Game, Home Run Nerf Ball
Football:  Field Goal Kicks, Obstacle Course, 40-yd Dash Set Up, Passing Accuracy, Target Games, Pass Receiving, Route Game
Basketball:  3-Point Shot Games, Slam Dunk Games, Bank Shot Games, Dribble Obstacle Courses, Hot Shot Game
Golf:  Greens w/Sand Traps, Swing Analyzer, Driving Cages
Other:  Nerf Archery, Junior Sports Area with Football, Baseball & Basketball Areas, Soccer-Accuracy Kick, Hockey-Slap Shot, SEGA Games Area

"Be sure to look for special appearances by some of your favorite sports  celebrities!"
   
     
     
The parking lot location was fairly well delineated, with the temporary fences covered with screening to help block the view out to the parked cars, and featured graphics of crowds in grandstands as a backdrop to the sporting events.